Six weeks in…

Many of us have done a bit of redevelopment. Upgrading the home we live in. Even arranging for trades to do a little more than a basic upgrade. That’s the category I fall into so this first 6 weeks has been a bit of a learning journey.

What we have learnt from demolishing the internal parts of the pub (the pros call it ‘enabling’) is that it was built in 4 parts going back some considerable time. We are trying to find out when.

This is evident because all the walls are now back to bare stone and we can see numerous old external walls, doorways and windows etc.

So what have we done to get this far? There is a process – not that I knew but there is.

We started with the ceilings, not because they are the hardest to bring down, but in an old property it is the filthiest of work. Not much plasterboard ceiling here – just straw, lath & plaster and dust and dust and dust. It’s difficult to take ceilings down without parts landing on your own head. Bear that in mind if you are thinking of doing it yourself. Once done you are left with bare joists. In an old property it is likely that some will have to come down due to rot, etc. But those that are left then have to be de-nailed. The job of That There Builder Girl in this property. Not hundreds but thousands of nails. This took me days of labour.

Then there is the clearing up each day. “Tidy workplace is a good workplace” quotes Neil the builder regularly. This too is filthy work, requires lots of shovels and wheelbarrows and skips.

When converting from commercial to residential it is a requirement that all external walls are insulated so there is no choice but to strip the walls bare. In this property this also proved to be filthy work as the walls were also made of straw, lath and plaster and even cob. Again, the wood framing that is retained needs to be de-nailed.

If you are knocking down walls, some will be taken down during the stripping process but those that may require an engineers eye may have to wait until the rest of the jobs are done.

Whilst this is going on , you can strip out electrical and telephone wiring and plumbing pipes. Hold onto them. Electrical wire has a value and can be sold by the kg bag. Copper also has a value as does other metal. Not a lot, but every penny counts!

The roof space next. A never ending load of dust laden insulation material. We found some metal bedframes, an asbestos water tank (needs careful removal) and all sorts of clothing. Not even a good wash could have persuaded me to recycle them. If you are afraid of spiders this is not the job for you. Eugh!

Then there is the floor downstairs. It is again a requirement to have the floor insulated and to ensure that there is a DPM (damp proof membrane). This means digging, digging and more digging. In our case removing over 70ton of flooring and going down through numerous layers – concrete tiles (easy), sand (easy), fibreboard (easy), flagstones (not so easy but sold on so who cares!), compacted dirt (not so easy) and rock (****hard). Hundreds of wheelbarrow journeys later and my arms now hang down by my ankles!

And then back to the solid walls and the staircase. The structural engineer has provided his instruction and we are taking them down in stages. Again, some walls are fairly new. Others have been made with handmade bricks. And we are back to where we started. Loads of dust and filth and wheelbarrows and skips.

And tools to use. Sledge hammers, crowbars, hammers and pick axe. Drill hammer and circular saw. Basher and breaker. Mini digger and steel props. Electric screwdriver, wire cutters and more.

Oh the joy for That There Builder Girl never ends. Joy indeed!

Author:

Not really a builder. Nor a girl in the youthful sense of the word. More a marketing woman. But needs must, and some effort has to go into sorting out this property. So a job change, a deep breath and off we go.

One thought on “Six weeks in…

  1. A little tip from me, having been there in France converting an old winery. Put some string round your trousers legs , you ask why but may already have meet the mice and rats

    Like

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